Posted by: Calmseas (Mike) | July 28, 2008

A Story About A Bear

There was once a small bear cub who lived with his bear family in the hollowed out base of a huge oak tree deep in the woods.  The woods were abundant with resources.  The berries were plentiful, wildlife abounded, and a nearby stream teamed with fish—oh, how the young bear loved to fish!  The cub thoroughly enjoyed his life in these woods.  He had lots of friends among the forest animals.  And he greatly looked forward to those long winter naps tucked away inside that wonderful old oak tree.

As time went on, the stream began to dry up, just a little at a time so that it was hardly noticeable at first.  After a while, the fishing was not as good as it used to be, and many of the young bear’s animal friends began to move away in search of a more sustaining place to live. By the time that the young bear grew to full adulthood, his parents and siblings had moved on to better hunting and fishing grounds.  Yet, alas, the young bear still had an attachment to this place that he called home—as it was really the only home that he had ever known.

Years went by.  The stream had long ago dried up.  The bear had reached middle-age, and all of his friends were long since gone.  Even the majestic oak tree had become ravaged by storms and insects.  His parents and siblings would send word to the bear from time to time encouraging him to leave that barren place and join them in a new and better land.  But somehow he remained captive to that place of his youth, a place that really had ceased to exist many years before.

The aging bear knew that things were vastly different now than they were when he was a young cub, and he knew that things could never again be the same as they once were.  In his heart of hearts, the bear knew that he, too, should leave the skeletal remains of his youth behind and move on.  But he was compelled to remain in that woods.  There were still a few animals left and he didn’t want to let them down.  After all, he was now a leader among those animals, and the void created if he left would be just too big.

The bear reasoned that he could still survive in the woods.  When it rained, he could still get a little bit of water out of the stream and think of old times.  He could subsist on berries that he would gather here and there.  He didn’t really need fish in his diet to survive anyway.  He could manage to get by.

And so the bear stayed in the woods were he was born.  The tree that was his home eventually crumbled to the ground.  The woods around him decayed and the dusty remains returned to the earth.  And soon the now old bear died, never having ventured from the home of his youth—never knowing the abundance of what might have been just beyond the woods, through the glen, and into a land of plenty beyond.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: